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INDEX  WEATHER
Temperature: 52.7°F | Humidity: 93% | Pressure: 30.23in (Steady) | Conditions: Clear | Wind Direction: West | Wind Speed: 0mph
INDEX

UP VALLEY SNOW
Down Valley Rain

December 18, 2009




Index in 2008. © 2008 Fast Eddy Boress. CLICK TO ENLARGE


Skykomish in 2008. © 2008 Fast Eddy Boress. CLICK TO ENLARGE


Index in 2008. © 2008 Fast Eddy Boress. CLICK TO ENLARGE


Skykomish 2008. © 2008 Fast Eddy Boress. CLICK TO ENLARGE


The Cougar, or mountain lion. Part of the wildlife around the upper valley. CLICK TO ENLARGE


Emergency Prepardeness document. CLICK TO DOWNLOAD OR ENLARGE
(UPPER SKY VALLEY) -- Those of us who live and work in the lower Sky Valley often forget there is a world of difference in the weather just a few miles up Highway 2 from Snohomish, Monroe, Sultan and elsewhere in the mid valley.

SVC Foreign Correspondent Ed Boress did a snow inspection up valley recently and he was quite surprised with what he found.


By Ed Boress

HOW STRANGE THE WEATHER: We traveled up to Skykomish recently to see how much snow had fallen. Boy, were we surprised!

Index had about three to four inches of snowfall in 24 hours and Skykomish was not much different. As a matter of fact, it was close to the same temperature as Index.

In any “normal” year, Skykomish would have 8-plus inches of snow compared to Index’s three to four inches.

Lest ye’ forget – here in the upper valley where we have real mountain weather, it can be very unforgiving.

To the right are a few photos from 2008 to show you what we mean -->

The snowfall you are viewing is from just a 36 hour period in Skykomish and Index during the 2008 storm.

Are you prepared for the rest of winter?

In the event you’re not, the World Famous Index Fire Department has distributed an emergency preparedness pamphlet which we have posted for you (in the PDF file) also to the right to download. Trust us. You need this.

When there is a power outage here in the upper valley during the winter – and sometimes in the lower valley as well - it’s not the typical 1 hour or 1 day ordeal.

We have personally gone without power for 5-plus days during the stormy season!

It only takes one driver to lose control on the “Highway Of Death” to knock out power for many days.

It’s not just the drivers though. Many times trees fall across power lines and power will be lost from parts of Gold Bar up through Baring during the wettest part of the season.

It is a good time throughout the valley to be prepared for what old man Winter has to throw at us for the rest of this year and in the first quarter of 2010.

FACTS ABOUT OUR CASCADE MOUNTAIN RANGE:

The Cascades extend northward for more than 700 miles (1,100 km) from Lassen Peak in northern California through Oregon and Washington to the Fraser River in southern British Columbia, Canada.

Many peaks exceed 10,000 feet (3,000 meters), including Mount Hood (11,235 feet [3,424 m], highest point in Oregon) and Mount Rainier (14,410 feet [4,392 m], highest in Washington and in the Cascade Range.

Most of the summits are extinct volcanoes, but Lassen Peak (10,457 feet [3,187 m]) and several others have erupted in the recent past.

Mount Baker (10,778 feet [3,285 m]) steamed heavily in 1975, and Mount St. Helens (8,365 feet [2,550 m]) really exploded in 1980 and again in 1981 but in a much more subdued form.

Except for the peaks lying above timberline, the entire Cascade Range is heavily wooded and is within conservation areas and national forests.

The western slopes where we live get up to 100 inches of precipitation yearly. Among the many wild animals we have up here are Cougars, the biggest cats in North America.

Adult male cougars average approximately 140 pounds but in a perfect situation may weigh 180 pounds and measure 7-8 feet long from nose to tip of tail. Adult males stand about 30 inches tall at the shoulder.

And if you ever see a Cougar while hiking up here, remember this: it is because he wants you to see him.

Have a community event, news tip, comment, news release, letter to the editor, Op-Ed piece or other information you’d like mentioned in the ALL NEW Sky Valley Chronicle? Send us the info at the contact points shown below. The World Famous Sky Valley Chronicle -- the ONLY Sky Valley news source serving up HOT, FRESH LOCAL NEWS for the Sky Valley 24/7!

To send SVC news tips or photos: newstip@skyvalleychronicle.com
To send News Releases: newsrelease@skyvalleychronicle.com
Letter To Editor: editorial@skyvalleychronicle.com
Phone tips to: 425-791-1471
To send bags full of money: Call. We'll send a limo.








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